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Strategy & Management

Current thinking on strategic and managment theories and how they apply to the multi-generational family enterprise.

Today’s edition kicks off a series of FFI Practitioner articles by members of the Editorial Committee. Thanks to this week’s contributor, Asher Noor, for this article examining the use of social media by family enterprises and providing three unique ideas for members of the earlier generation to engage on social media platforms. #WeHopeYouEnjoy

Thank you to this week’s contributor, Matthew Erskine, for providing this thoughtful examination of the “Success to the Successful” model and applying to succession in family enterprises.

Is the traditional method of family business leadership succession, where the successor joins the business at a young age and gradually learns the values and business knowledge from the senior generation, still the best approach? In this week’s FFI Practitioner, contributors Zografia Bika, Peter Rosa, and Fahri Karakas examine this question through a study of a multi-generational Scottish construction company and share actionable insights for advisors helping clients with succession planning.

Thank you to this week’s contributor, Randy Waesche, for this thought-provoking examination of the influence that money and financial independence can have in the succession process.

CEO succession to a non-family executive is particularly challenging to a CEO who is a family member. For executive recruiters, “Will the CEO really let go?” is always a concern expressed by those around the incumbent. This week’s edition by Bruce Walton discusses success factors that help consultants prepare their clients to let go as part of a successful leadership transition.

What organizational configurations lead to the highest levels of innovation in family firms? In this week’s edition, which is a précis of “A Configurational Approach to Family Firm Innovation,” an article appearing in the June 2019 issue of FBR, Navneet Bhatnagar explores this question and its implications for family enterprise advisors.

This week’s FFI Practitioner features a conversation between Joshua Nacht and Steve Legler on the topic of “family champions” and Joshua’s recently-released book on the subject. Joshua and Steve discuss how to identify and develop a family champion as well as how practitioners can leverage a family champion in their work with family enterprises. We hope you enjoy listening!

Panta rhei. Everything flows and evolves. And family businesses are no exception. From the first-generation founder firm to a real family firm in later generations, and from a single business firm to a complex portfolio business. In some instances, that transition in the family firm – from one to many businesses – happens rather suddenly, in a revolutionary way. Such transformations usually require a few key elements: a natural entrepreneur in the later generations of the family and… a major liquidity event that financially enables the transformation. Marta Widz and

Thank you to Núria Vilanova, this week’s contributor, for continuing FFI Practitioner’s series of articles written in both English and Spanish by members of the FFI IberoAmerican Virtual Study Group. In this week’s edition, Núria explores the themes of her recent book, which addresses the importance of family enterprises implementing a communication strategy that incorporates the family’s values.

What can family enterprises learn from a book titled, Who Moved My Cheese? Thanks to this week’s contributor, Ashvini Chopra, for sharing a case study that applies the book’s lessons about change and adaptability to a recent scenario Ashvini encountered with one of his family business clients.

Thanks to Gaia Marchisio for this week’s article which discusses the importance of recognizing and addressing strong beliefs about “universal truths” and misconceptions in the field of family enterprise. In this article, Gaia urges advisers to avoid becoming too narrow-minded and entrenched in an established way of thinking. Instead, she encourages advisers to maintain an outsider’s perspective on conventional family business truths that are often taken for granted.

When family business owners are evaluating non-family ownership succession options, often their advisers may suggest two primary options; selling the business to a “strategic buyer” or a “financial buyer.” However, this week’s edition presents an alternative option – selling the business to the employees, a “friendly buyer,” through an ESOP. Thank you to this week’s contributor, Dan Bayston, for sharing his analysis of ESOPs and the role they can play in a non-family ownership succession plan.

In a rapidly evolving and increasingly competitive environment, is the need for an Entrepreneurial Orientation critical to ensuring the long-term survival of family firms? In this week’s edition, which is a précis of “Entrepreneurial Orientation and the Family Firm: Mapping the Field and Tracing a Path for Future Research,” an article appearing in the September issue of FBR, Maya Prabhu explores this question and the important implications of this research on the field.

Do married couples make the most effective leaders of family firms? According to research conducted by this week’s contributor, Isabelle Le Breton-Miller of HEC Montréal, firms owned and run by married couples tend to outperform their competition. We hope you enjoy this edition that examines the potential advantages that married copreneurs can bring to a family enterprise.

This week’s FFI Practitioner continues the month-long series of editions relating to the theme of “Reflections.” Thank you to Ken Moores for this reflective précis, where he examines the research conducted about developing a legacy of an entrepreneurial mindset in “The Development of an Entrepreneurial Legacy: Exploring the Role of Anticipated Futures in Transgenerational Entrepreneurship,” an article that appears in the September 2018 issue of FBR.

This week’s FFI Practitioner continues a series of articles written by members of the FFI IberoAmerican Virtual Study Group that are available in both English and Spanish. Thanks to Miguel Angel Gallo and Begoña Pereira-Otero for their examination of what constitutes an appropriate exercise of power by family business owners. We hope you enjoy this article in either (or both) languages!

Thanks to Sylvain Daudel of Stetson University for adding to several provocative FFI Practitioner articles on the topic of generational transition! He argues that the paradigm is wrong — it’s not about longevity but about value creation.

Is the pursuit of longevity by family businesses a flawed goal? Almost every practitioner would strongly answer ‘no!” However, for this week’s edition, Asher Noor has decided to adopt the contrarian position in this provocative and Shakespearean inspired piece. Let the play begin!

Family firms, like all modern businesses, must depend on growing levels of innovation in order to survive in an increasingly competitive global marketplace. This week, Diogo Cotta and Niklas Rossbach from Maastricht University discuss some alarming trends concerning innovation in family businesses and introduce a research project they’re conducting to learn more about how family businesses approach innovation opportunities.

When confronted with the need to go outside the family company for new leadership, most families have no idea what that process entails and how to go about it. This case study will help advisers guide clients wrestling with such an issue and recognize the value of resources available to help. Thanks to Bruce Walton of Battalia Winston for the article and case study.