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Educating Family Businesses

Educational resources, e.g., university based forums, and other formal tools for professionals to use with clients.

In this week’s edition, we are pleased to share a piece about OKR Leadership, a management methodology that can help advisors organize and measure their clients’ succession planning process.

For this week’s edition, we are pleased to continue our series featuring a diverse selection of family business cases previously published in FFI Practitioner.

Thanks to this week’s contributor, Morio Nishikawa, for providing this case study about the Seibu Group, a Japanese family-owned business that faced a variety of legal challenges beginning in 1993 as the country’s laws changed, and the company’s practices and protocols were not updated.

How do we keep ourselves and our clients thriving during times of complexity and disruption? According to this week’s contributor, Eva Wathén, it comes down to resilience. Thanks to Eva for sharing this article, in which she presents the importance of taking your “strategic pulse.”

At first, it seemed ridiculous – how could they possibly fill the shoes of their father, Greg, who built such a remarkable portfolio of commercial real estate holdings? And how would they ever figure out how to work together?

In today’s world, family business owners have a lot to worry about – from rising taxes to developing future leadership.

In this week’s edition, we are pleased to feature a selection of family business cases published in FFI Practitioner earlier this year. These cases can serve as effective tools to incorporate in consulting and educational work with clients and further the FFI Practitioner mission to provide readers with practical materials that support their work with multi-generational family enterprises.

Thank you to this week’s contributors, Randel Carlock and Keng-Fun Loh, for this examination of the enhanced Parallel Planning Process (PPP), a tool that can help advisors to professionalize the family and business planning process.

Is the traditional method of family business leadership succession, where the successor joins the business at a young age and gradually learns the values and business knowledge from the senior generation, still the best approach? In this week’s FFI Practitioner, contributors Zografia Bika, Peter Rosa, and Fahri Karakas examine this question through a study of a multi-generational Scottish construction company and share actionable insights for advisors helping clients with succession planning.

CEO succession to a non-family executive is particularly challenging to a CEO who is a family member.

How can family advisors help their clients when they are so enmeshed in conflict that they seem to have erected impenetrable barriers? According to this week’s contributors, Mitzi Perdue and Amy Castoro, advisors can utilize three communication techniques to break down these barriers and address the underlying causes of the conflict. Mitzi and Amy have illustrated these techniques with an instructive case study that can be shared with clients.

This week’s FFI Practitioner features a conversation between Joshua Nacht and Steve Legler on the topic of “family champions” and Joshua’s recently-released book on the subject. Joshua and Steve discuss how to identify and develop a family champion as well as how practitioners can leverage a family champion in their work with family enterprises. We hope you enjoy listening!

Panta rhei. Everything flows and evolves. And family businesses are no exception. From the first-generation founder firm to a real family firm in later generations, and from a single business firm to a complex portfolio business. In some instances, that transition in the family firm – from one to many businesses – happens rather suddenly, in a revolutionary way. Such transformations usually require a few key elements: a natural entrepreneur in the later generations of the family and… a major liquidity event that financially enables the transformation. Marta Widz and

Every Wednesday authors for FFI Practitioner share insights on the field of family enterprise advising and consulting from a variety of vantage points. Today we’d like to invite you to Write for FFI Practitioner! And… as inspiration, we point you toward examples of articles from contributors across the globe and some topics that could use more contributors.

Thanks to Mitzi Perdue for this case study discussing some of the perils involved in misunderstanding core concepts underlying the frequently invoked “chain of command.” It is an instructive article for advisors and a case that could be shared with clients.

What can family enterprises learn from a book titled, Who Moved My Cheese? Thanks to this week’s contributor, Ashvini Chopra, for sharing a case study that applies the book’s lessons about change and adaptability to a recent scenario Ashvini encountered with one of his family business clients.

Family business cases can serve as powerful tools to integrate into consulting and educational work with clients. Cases provide an engaging way for family enterprise members to recognize issues similar to the ones they face, helping evaluate potential, less emotionally-charged solutions. To further this publication’s mission to provide readers with practical materials that support their work with multi-generational family enterprises, we are pleased to feature a selection of family business cases previously published in FFI Practitioner.

In many parts of the world, October 31 is Halloween, so we couldn’t resist featuring some topics that might seem scary to approach with your clients. In the spirit of Halloween, here are some spooky editions.

One of the primary goals of FFI Practitioner is to provide readers with thought-provoking and practical articles to improve the services they offer to their family enterprise clients and the field in general. To further this mission, this week, we are pleased to feature a selection of articles addressing common topics, across disciplines, that can be used as examples or conversation starters with clients.

Thank you to Patricia Angus of the FFI Practitioner editorial committee for kicking off a month-long series of editions relating to the theme of “Reflections.” In this week’s edition, Patricia reflects on the complexities of defining some key terminology in the field. In upcoming weeks, we’re excited to continue this reflective theme with pieces by Jamie Weiner, Ken Moores, Paul Chung and Chin Chin Koh, and an interview with Dennis Jaffe. We hope you enjoy the series!