Image Alt

Educating Family Businesses

Educational resources, e.g., university based forums, and other formal tools for professionals to use with clients.

Thank you to this week’s contributors from the FFI Asian Circle Virtual Study Group, Mita Dixit and Esther Kong.

Thanks to Steven Rolfe for this week’s edition about the importance of recognizing the impacts that a family business leader’s personal life crisis can have on the entire enterprise. In his article, Steven shares two examples and his reflections for practitioners to consider when their clients are confronted with such a scenario.

Thanks to Vijay Sathe, Alfredo Enrione, Donna Finley for this week’s edition, which is a case study about how five sisters, who suddenly and unexpectedly inherited their father’s businesses, and how they dealt with the influence of two executors to reach harmonious ownership of the family enterprise.

Thanks to Marta Widz and Sameh Abadir from IMD for this article based on the Jebsen & Jessen Family Enterprise story, which illustrates how responsible leadership and early awareness can coalesce to pioneer safety, environmental sustainability, and stewardship strategies and thus lead to impactful social innovation.

This week, we are pleased to share a case study that demonstrates how effective corporate and family governance can help clarify decision-making protocols in family enterprises. Thanks to Roberto Vainrub for sharing this case with practical implications for advisors.

Thanks to Michael Madera for this article discussing three wise moves to help your family enterprise clients understand and respond to external crises.

Thanks to Ricardo Mejia for this case study discussing how education and clear rules of engagement may still be the best strategy for developing young entrepreneurs in family enterprises.

Thanks to Doug Gray for his article on VIA Classification assessment tools, which can help family enterprise practitioners think differently about their clients’ family system.

This week, we are pleased to continue the series of commentaries on the 2086 Society sponsored research “Professionalizing the Business Family: The Five Pillars of Competent, Committed and Sustainable Ownership.”

This week, we are pleased to share a family business case illustrating how Firmenich, the world’s largest privately-owned perfume and taste company, has utilized their concentrated family ownership and governance model to navigate worldwide crises.

In this week’s edition, we are pleased to share a piece about OKR Leadership, a management methodology that can help advisors organize and measure their clients’ succession planning process.

For this week’s edition, we are pleased to continue our series featuring a diverse selection of family business cases previously published in FFI Practitioner.

Thanks to this week’s contributor, Morio Nishikawa, for providing this case study about the Seibu Group, a Japanese family-owned business that faced a variety of legal challenges beginning in 1993 as the country’s laws changed, and the company’s practices and protocols were not updated.

How do we keep ourselves and our clients thriving during times of complexity and disruption? According to this week’s contributor, Eva Wathén, it comes down to resilience. Thanks to Eva for sharing this article, in which she presents the importance of taking your “strategic pulse.”

At first, it seemed ridiculous – how could they possibly fill the shoes of their father, Greg, who built such a remarkable portfolio of commercial real estate holdings? And how would they ever figure out how to work together?

In today’s world, family business owners have a lot to worry about – from rising taxes to developing future leadership.

In this week’s edition, we are pleased to feature a selection of family business cases published in FFI Practitioner earlier this year. These cases can serve as effective tools to incorporate in consulting and educational work with clients and further the FFI Practitioner mission to provide readers with practical materials that support their work with multi-generational family enterprises.

Thank you to this week’s contributors, Randel Carlock and Keng-Fun Loh, for this examination of the enhanced Parallel Planning Process (PPP), a tool that can help advisors to professionalize the family and business planning process.

Is the traditional method of family business leadership succession, where the successor joins the business at a young age and gradually learns the values and business knowledge from the senior generation, still the best approach? In this week’s FFI Practitioner, contributors Zografia Bika, Peter Rosa, and Fahri Karakas examine this question through a study of a multi-generational Scottish construction company and share actionable insights for advisors helping clients with succession planning.

CEO succession to a non-family executive is particularly challenging to a CEO who is a family member.